Hall Of Fame 2002

Frank BuckleyFrank W. Buckley

(Southwest Texas State University)
Dr. Frank W. Buckley was the chair of the Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University-San Marcos) journalism department, director of the university’s news and information services and adviser to the student newspaper. He volunteered SWTSU to serve as a permanent headquarters for TIPA in 1969. In 1978, the advisers’ association established The Frank W. Buckley Scholarships. In 1992, the TIPA membership voted to change the name to The Frank W. Buckley Scholarship Fund.

Charles T. “Chuck” Choate

(Eastfield College)
In 1988, at the TIPA annual convention, the student delegates voted unanimously to name the Adviser of the Year Award in memory of Charles T. “Chuck” Choate. He was student publications adviser at Eastfield College and died in January 1987. Choate had a long history of professional involvement in journalism and taught in Oklahoma and California. Choate was remembered by former students as a man who “valued the meaning of the word adviser” and whose students “were not taught, they were allowed to learn.”

Jeff HendersonJeff Henderson

(Southwest Texas State University)
Jeff Henderson served as TIPA executive director for more than 20 years. Under his direction, the association developed into one of the most respected college media organizations in the United States. His journalism career includes newspapers in Lubbock and Alpine and teaching at Sul Ross State University, Odessa College and Central Texas College before joining the faculty and heading student publications at Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University-San Marcos). The Jeff Henderson Scholarship for Journalistic Excellence was established in 2001 in honor and appreciation of his services to TIPA.

Mike WarmsMike Warms

(Trinity Valley Community College)
Mike Warms was the student publications adviser at Trinity Valley Community College. As a publications adviser, he received the Award of Distinguished Merit and the Edith Fox King Award from the Interscholastic League Press Conference for outstanding service to scholastic journalism. He died Dec. 24, 1991. In 1992, the TIPA membership voted to name the scholarship given to community college students the Mike Warms Memorial Scholarship.

Joseph C. McElhannon

(Baylor University)
Joseph C. McElhannon is considered the founder or “the father” of TIPA. The idea for TIPA formed while he was a student at Baylor University where he was the exchange editor for The Literary, a student magazine. His idea was to bring Texas colleges together to share student publications techniques. The association conceived in McElhannon’s mind has made a dramatic impact on journalism education in Texas and the nation. After graduating from Baylor, he earned his MA and Ph.D from the University of Chicago. He taught in many public school districts around the state and served as dean at both Sam Houston State Teachers College and Southeast Texas Teachers College. In 1938, he joined the Baylor faculty where he taught for 30 years.

Ernest SansomErnest Sansom

(Southwestern University)
Ernest Sansom was editor of the 1910 Southwestern University Magazine and was a representative at the TIPA organizational meeting at Baylor.

J.R. RatliffJ.R. Ratliff

(Decatur Baptist College)
J. Robert Ratliff served as editor of the Decatur Baptist College (now Dallas Baptist University) publication Black and Gold and represented DBC at the TIPA organization meeting in 1909.

Christine WoldertChristine E. Woldert

(College of Industrial Arts)
Christine Woldert was the only female officer involved in organizing TIPA in 1909. She graduated from the College of Industrial Arts (now Texas Woman’s University) in 1911. She was TIPA secretary (1909-1911), a member of the Chaparral Literary Club, editor-in-chief of the Daedalian Monthly and literary editor of the Daedalian Monthly.

Clois GreeneClois L. Greene

(TCU)
Clois Luther Greene was from Vernon, Texas and attended TCU where he served as president of the Walton Literary Society in 1907 and president of the Add-Ran Literary Society in 1908. During both years, he also served as president of the Oratory Club. He was an English major and served as editor of TCU’s Collegian in 1909 and was also manager for TCU’s football, basketball and track teams between 1907 and 1909.

Walter Ford

(Daniel Baker College)
Walter Ford served as editor of the Daniel Baker College (now Howard Payne University) publication Collegian. He was one of the three committee members responsible for drafting the TIPA constitution in 1909.

David H TempletonDavid Henry Templeton

(Trinity College)
The Rev. David Henry Templeton was one of the founding students of TIPA in 1909. At that time, he was serving as an exchange editor for student publications at Trinity University, located in Waxahachie, Texas (now located in San Antonio). Following graduation in 1910 from Trinity, the Rev. Templeton completed seminary studies and began serving in pastoral positions from 1915 to 1950 throughout Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana.

C.C. Prim

(North Texas State Normal College)
C.C. Prim was a young, determined man from Decker, Texas. He was a member of the Junior Five, Reagan Literary Society, editor-in-chief of The North Texas Normal Journal and The Yucca at North State Normal College (now the University of North Texas). At various times he served as president, corresponding secretary and treasurer for the Reagan Literary Society. He was the fifth junior representative for the NTSNC yearbook in 1909. He held many positions within the journalism department, but spent most of his time working for the school newspaper and yearbook.

John V ConnorJohn Vastine Connor

(Simmons College)
John Vastine Connor lived in Big Spring, Texas prior to registering at Simmons College in Abilene (now Hardin-Simmons University) in 1909. Registered at Simmons College as the Rev. John Vastine Connor, he was chief editor of the Corral, a monthly literary magazine that also reported campus news and events. He was a member of the yearbook staff, president of the Oratorical Club and played in the college Mission Band.